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Tri-County Small Animal Hospital

Tri-County Small Animal Hospital

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Tri-County Small Animal Hospital, P.C.
1054 E. Tri-County Blvd.
Oliver Springs, TN 37840

(DIRECTIONS)

phone: (865) 435-1374
fax: (865) 435-3949
tricountyanimal@gmail.com
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OFFICE HOURS

Mon  7:30a- 5:30p

Tue   8:00a - 6:00p

Wed  8:30a - 5:30p

Thur  8:00a - 5:30p

Fri  8:00a - 6:00p

Saturday
8:30a - 12:00p

Sunday  Closed

 

Payment Methods:
Cash, Check, Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Discover, & CareCredit  Barter is Better with Tradebank
OUR MISSION STATEMENT
We vow to treat each patient as if it were our own.

Our primary objectives are:

1. Client education
2. Excellence in pet health care
3. Professional appearance
4. Honest, courteous, and enthusiastic work environment

Is your pet stressed about having to come to the vet?
At Tri-County Small Animal Hospital we are doing everything we can to make your pet's visit as free of fear as possible with:

  • Calming music in the waiting area and exam rooms
  • Species-specific pheromones in exam rooms that help to reduce anxiety in dogs and cats
  • Lots of treats during visits
  • Pet massage before and after exams
  • Low volume injections and oral vaccines that make the vaccine experience more comfortable
  • Staff and veterinarians that are trained on reading pets' body language during visits and using proper restraint techniques.

We treat your pets the same way we treat our own!
We sit on the floor with them :)


  **May Special**

     

  

10% off All Heartworm Tests for the Month of May!!!!

What is Heartworm disease?


Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal disease in pets. It is caused by foot-long worms (heartworms) that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected pets, causing severe lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs in the body. Heartworm disease affects dogs, cats and ferrets, but heartworms also live in other mammal species, including wolves, coyotes, foxes, sea lions and—in rare instances—humans.


Transmission:


Adult female heartworms living in an infected dog, fox, coyote, or wolf produce microscopic baby worms called microfilaria that circulate in the bloodstream. When a mosquito bites and takes a blood meal from an infected animal, it picks up these baby worms, which develop and mature into “infective stage” larvae over a period of 10 to 14 days. Then, when the infected mosquito bites another dog, cat, or susceptible wild animal, the infective larvae are deposited onto the surface of the animal's skin and enter the new host through the mosquito’s bite wound. Once inside a new host, it takes approximately 6 months for the larvae to mature into adult heartworms. Once mature, heartworms can live for 5 to 7 years in dogs and up to 2 or 3 years in cats. Because of the longevity of these worms, each mosquito season can lead to an increasing number of worms in an infected pet.


Treatments:


Once your veterinarian has determined your dog is stable and ready for heartworm treatment, he or she will recommend a treatment protocol involving several steps. The American Heartworm Society has guidelines for developing this plan of attack. Dogs with no signs or mild signs of heartworm disease, such as cough or exercise intolerance, have a high success rate with treatment. More severe disease can also be successfully treated, but the possibility of complications is greater. The severity of heartworm disease does not always correlate with the severity of symptoms, and dogs with many worms may have few or no symptoms early in the course of the disease.


Unfortunately, there is no approved drug therapy for heartworm infection in cats, and the drug used to treat infections in dogs is not safe for cats. Nevertheless, cats with heartworm disease can often be helped with good veterinary care. The goal is to stabilize your cat and determine a long-term management plan. (Resources found on https://www.heartwormsociety.org/pet-owner-resources/heartworm-basics)


Prevention:


Annual heartworm testing and monthly preventatives are highly recommended. Your veterinarian can help distinguish which preventative is a good fit for your pet.  This is a disease that can kill your pet or at the very least cause extensive health problems.  Preventatives can help decrease chances of exposure to heartworms, so your pet can have a happy, healthy life.  Remember “An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure,” (Benjamin Franklin). 

Schedule an appointment in the month of May and receive 10% off all heartworm tests.  Call (865)435-1374

Tri-County Small Animal Hospital

10% Off All Heartworm Tests

Void if altered, copied, sold, purchased, transferred, exchanged, or where prohibited or restricted by law.  No other coupon may be used with this coupon. Offer expires on 5/31/2016.

Discount ID: heartwormtest/2016


When it comes to the proper care of your pet, Tri-County Small Animal Hospital in Oliver Springs can help you.  Dr. Linda Osborne and staff have patients from all over the community that rely on them for all of their pet's needs from routine shots to surgical treatment.  See more services.

Located just north of Oak Ridge Hwy on E. Tri-County Boulevard, we are conveniently located to communities in Oak Ridge, Oliver Springs, Coalfield, Wartburg, Clinton, and Harriman.  We have many patients even come to us from Knoxville.

Tri-County Small Animal Hospital
1054 East Tri-County Blvd.
Oliver Springs, TN 37840
(865) 435-1374
Fax: (865)435-3949
Email: tricountyanimal@gmail.com
Like Us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/TriCountyAnimal/